The role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the immunopathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Fariz Nurwidya, Triya Damayanti, Faisal Yunus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the airways and lungs that results in limitations of continuous airflow and is caused by exposure to noxious gasses and particles. A major cause of morbidity and mortality in adults, COPD is a complex disease pathologically mediated by many inflammatory pathways. Macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and CD8+ T-lymphocytes are the key inflammatory cells involved in COPD. Recently, the non-coding small RNA, micro-RNA, have also been intensively investigated and evidence suggest that it plays a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Here, we discuss the accumulated evidence that has since revealed the role of each inflammatory cell and their involvement in the immunopathogenesis of COPD. Mechanisms of steroid resistance in COPD will also be briefly discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-13
Number of pages9
JournalTuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Chronic obstructive
  • Dendritic cells
  • Lymphocytes
  • Macrophages
  • Neutrophils
  • Pulmonary disease

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