The relationship between the built environment and respiratory health: Evidence from a longitudinal study in Indonesia

Witri Indriyani, Muhammad Halley Yudhistira, Prani Sastiono, Djoni Hartono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiple studies have discussed the relationship between the built environment and non-infectious diseases, but research involving infectious diseases and the built environment is scarce. How the built environment is associated with infectious diseases varies across areas, and previous literature produces mixed results. This study investigated the relationship between the built environment and infectious diseases in Indonesia, which has different settings compared to developed countries. We combined the longitudinal panel data, Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS), and land cover data to examine the relationship between the built environment and the likelihood of contracting respiratory infectious diseases. We focused on the sprawl index to measure the built environment. The study confirmed that a sprawling neighbourhood is linked to lower respiratory infection symptoms by employing a fixed effect method. The association is more evident in urban areas and for females. The results also suggested that the linkage works through housing quality, such as housing crowdedness and ventilation, and neighbourhood conditions like neighbourhood transportation modes and air pollution levels. Thus, our results underlined the need to consider the health consequences of the densification policy and determine the direction of landscape planning and policy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101193
JournalSSM - Population Health
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2022

Keywords

  • Built environment
  • Communicable disease
  • Fixed effect
  • Health
  • Respiratory infection
  • Sprawl index

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