The psychology of corruption: The role of the counterfeit self, entity self-theory, and outcome-based ethical mindset

Juneman Abraham, Julia Suleeman, Bagus Takwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies were conducted aimed at identifying the dynamics which contribute to corrupt behavior. Study 1 was a correlational study of 994 senior high school students (457 males, 537 females; 426 from North Sumatera, 568 from West Kalimantan; Mage=15.93 years, SDage=1.123 years), with a data analysis technique of structural equation modelling, to test the significance of the role of the counterfeit self (predictor) as well as an ethical mindset and self-theory (moderator candidates), in predicting moral disengagement (the dependent variable of Study 1, as the proxy of corruption behavior). Study 2 was a quasi-experimental study of 154 university students in Jakarta (68 men, 86 women; Mage=19.167 years, SDage=1.476 years) to test the hypotheses of the moderating effects of an outcome-based ethical mindset and entity self-theory on the effects of the counterfeit self on corruption behavior (dependent variable Study 2, operationally defined as performance in a bribery game) with a data analysis technique of the two-way ANOVA. The results of these studies (Study 1 and Study 2) generally confirm the hypotheses proposed. This was the first time the corruption psychological theoretical model had been examined in Indonesia, based on performance in a corruption game.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-32
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Psychological and Educational Research
Volume26
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Corruption
  • Counterfeit self
  • Implicit theory
  • Inauthenticity
  • Moral mindset

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