The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with body fat distribution in middle-aged individuals from Indonesia and the Netherlands: A cross-sectional analysis of two population-based studies

Fathimah S. Sigit, Dicky L. Tahapary, Stella Trompet, Erliyani Sartono, Ko Willems Van Dijk, Frits R. Rosendaal, Renée De Mutsert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background : The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies among populations with different ethnicities. Asian populations develop metabolic complications at lower amounts of adiposity than western populations. The role of abdominal obesity in the metabolic differences between the two populations is poorly understood. Objectives: Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the relative contribution of its components in the Indonesian and the Dutch population, as well as to examine the associations of overall and abdominal obesity with metabolic syndrome. Methods: In this cross-sectional study of middle-aged adults in the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity Study (n = 6602) and the Indonesian National Health Surveillance (n = 10,575), metabolic syndrome was defined by the unified IDF and AHA/NHLBI criteria. We performed logistic and linear regressions to examine associations of BMI and waist circumference with the metabolic syndrome, mutually adjusted for waist circumference and BMI. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 28% and 46% in Indonesian men and women, and 36% and 24% in Dutch men and women. The most prominent components were hypertension (61%) and hyperglycemia (51%) in the Indonesian, and hypertension (62%) and abdominal obesity (40%) in the Dutch population. Per SD in BMI and waist circumference, odds ratios (ORs, 95% CI) of metabolic syndrome were 1.5 (1.3-1.8) and 2.3 (1.9-2.7) in Indonesian men and 1.7 (1.2-2.5) and 2.9 (2.1-4.1) in Dutch men. The ORs of metabolic syndrome were 1.4 (1.2-1.6) and 2.3 (2.0-2.7) in Indonesian women and 1.0 (0.8-1.3) and 4.2 (3.2-5.4) in Dutch women. Conclusion: More Indonesian women than men have metabolic syndrome, whereas the opposite is true for the Dutch population. In both the Indonesian and the Dutch populations, hypertension is the primary contributor to the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In both populations, abdominal adiposity was more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome than overall adiposity.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2
JournalDiabetology and Metabolic Syndrome
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2020

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Body Fat Distribution
Indonesia
Netherlands
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population
Adiposity
Waist Circumference
Abdominal Obesity
Hypertension
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Hyperglycemia
Linear Models
Epidemiology
Obesity
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Abdominal obesity
  • BMI
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Waist circumference

Cite this

@article{5380f7e9d9314883896153eae28b2bf1,
title = "The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with body fat distribution in middle-aged individuals from Indonesia and the Netherlands: A cross-sectional analysis of two population-based studies",
abstract = "Background : The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies among populations with different ethnicities. Asian populations develop metabolic complications at lower amounts of adiposity than western populations. The role of abdominal obesity in the metabolic differences between the two populations is poorly understood. Objectives: Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the relative contribution of its components in the Indonesian and the Dutch population, as well as to examine the associations of overall and abdominal obesity with metabolic syndrome. Methods: In this cross-sectional study of middle-aged adults in the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity Study (n = 6602) and the Indonesian National Health Surveillance (n = 10,575), metabolic syndrome was defined by the unified IDF and AHA/NHLBI criteria. We performed logistic and linear regressions to examine associations of BMI and waist circumference with the metabolic syndrome, mutually adjusted for waist circumference and BMI. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 28{\%} and 46{\%} in Indonesian men and women, and 36{\%} and 24{\%} in Dutch men and women. The most prominent components were hypertension (61{\%}) and hyperglycemia (51{\%}) in the Indonesian, and hypertension (62{\%}) and abdominal obesity (40{\%}) in the Dutch population. Per SD in BMI and waist circumference, odds ratios (ORs, 95{\%} CI) of metabolic syndrome were 1.5 (1.3-1.8) and 2.3 (1.9-2.7) in Indonesian men and 1.7 (1.2-2.5) and 2.9 (2.1-4.1) in Dutch men. The ORs of metabolic syndrome were 1.4 (1.2-1.6) and 2.3 (2.0-2.7) in Indonesian women and 1.0 (0.8-1.3) and 4.2 (3.2-5.4) in Dutch women. Conclusion: More Indonesian women than men have metabolic syndrome, whereas the opposite is true for the Dutch population. In both the Indonesian and the Dutch populations, hypertension is the primary contributor to the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In both populations, abdominal adiposity was more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome than overall adiposity.",
keywords = "Abdominal obesity, BMI, Metabolic syndrome, Waist circumference",
author = "Sigit, {Fathimah S.} and Tahapary, {Dicky L.} and Stella Trompet and Erliyani Sartono and {Willems Van Dijk}, Ko and Rosendaal, {Frits R.} and {De Mutsert}, Ren{\'e}e",
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The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with body fat distribution in middle-aged individuals from Indonesia and the Netherlands : A cross-sectional analysis of two population-based studies. / Sigit, Fathimah S.; Tahapary, Dicky L.; Trompet, Stella; Sartono, Erliyani; Willems Van Dijk, Ko; Rosendaal, Frits R.; De Mutsert, Renée.

In: Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2, 07.01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with body fat distribution in middle-aged individuals from Indonesia and the Netherlands

T2 - A cross-sectional analysis of two population-based studies

AU - Sigit, Fathimah S.

AU - Tahapary, Dicky L.

AU - Trompet, Stella

AU - Sartono, Erliyani

AU - Willems Van Dijk, Ko

AU - Rosendaal, Frits R.

AU - De Mutsert, Renée

PY - 2020/1/7

Y1 - 2020/1/7

N2 - Background : The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies among populations with different ethnicities. Asian populations develop metabolic complications at lower amounts of adiposity than western populations. The role of abdominal obesity in the metabolic differences between the two populations is poorly understood. Objectives: Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the relative contribution of its components in the Indonesian and the Dutch population, as well as to examine the associations of overall and abdominal obesity with metabolic syndrome. Methods: In this cross-sectional study of middle-aged adults in the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity Study (n = 6602) and the Indonesian National Health Surveillance (n = 10,575), metabolic syndrome was defined by the unified IDF and AHA/NHLBI criteria. We performed logistic and linear regressions to examine associations of BMI and waist circumference with the metabolic syndrome, mutually adjusted for waist circumference and BMI. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 28% and 46% in Indonesian men and women, and 36% and 24% in Dutch men and women. The most prominent components were hypertension (61%) and hyperglycemia (51%) in the Indonesian, and hypertension (62%) and abdominal obesity (40%) in the Dutch population. Per SD in BMI and waist circumference, odds ratios (ORs, 95% CI) of metabolic syndrome were 1.5 (1.3-1.8) and 2.3 (1.9-2.7) in Indonesian men and 1.7 (1.2-2.5) and 2.9 (2.1-4.1) in Dutch men. The ORs of metabolic syndrome were 1.4 (1.2-1.6) and 2.3 (2.0-2.7) in Indonesian women and 1.0 (0.8-1.3) and 4.2 (3.2-5.4) in Dutch women. Conclusion: More Indonesian women than men have metabolic syndrome, whereas the opposite is true for the Dutch population. In both the Indonesian and the Dutch populations, hypertension is the primary contributor to the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In both populations, abdominal adiposity was more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome than overall adiposity.

AB - Background : The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies among populations with different ethnicities. Asian populations develop metabolic complications at lower amounts of adiposity than western populations. The role of abdominal obesity in the metabolic differences between the two populations is poorly understood. Objectives: Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the relative contribution of its components in the Indonesian and the Dutch population, as well as to examine the associations of overall and abdominal obesity with metabolic syndrome. Methods: In this cross-sectional study of middle-aged adults in the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity Study (n = 6602) and the Indonesian National Health Surveillance (n = 10,575), metabolic syndrome was defined by the unified IDF and AHA/NHLBI criteria. We performed logistic and linear regressions to examine associations of BMI and waist circumference with the metabolic syndrome, mutually adjusted for waist circumference and BMI. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 28% and 46% in Indonesian men and women, and 36% and 24% in Dutch men and women. The most prominent components were hypertension (61%) and hyperglycemia (51%) in the Indonesian, and hypertension (62%) and abdominal obesity (40%) in the Dutch population. Per SD in BMI and waist circumference, odds ratios (ORs, 95% CI) of metabolic syndrome were 1.5 (1.3-1.8) and 2.3 (1.9-2.7) in Indonesian men and 1.7 (1.2-2.5) and 2.9 (2.1-4.1) in Dutch men. The ORs of metabolic syndrome were 1.4 (1.2-1.6) and 2.3 (2.0-2.7) in Indonesian women and 1.0 (0.8-1.3) and 4.2 (3.2-5.4) in Dutch women. Conclusion: More Indonesian women than men have metabolic syndrome, whereas the opposite is true for the Dutch population. In both the Indonesian and the Dutch populations, hypertension is the primary contributor to the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In both populations, abdominal adiposity was more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome than overall adiposity.

KW - Abdominal obesity

KW - BMI

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Waist circumference

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U2 - 10.1186/s13098-019-0503-1

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VL - 12

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