The Infectious Uveitis Treatment Algorithm Network (TITAN) Report 1—global current practice patterns for the management of Herpes Simplex Virus and Varicella Zoster Virus anterior uveitis

on behalf of TITAN consensus guidelines group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: To present current expert practice patterns and to formulate a consensus for the management of HSV and VZV AU by uveitis specialists worldwide. Methods: A two-round online modified Delphi survey with masking of the study team was conducted. Responses were collected from 76 international uveitis experts from 21 countries. Current practices in the diagnosis and treatment of HSV and VZV AU were identified. A working group (The Infectious Uveitis Treatment Algorithm Network [TITAN]) developed data into consensus guidelines. Consensus is defined as a particular response towards a specific question meeting ≥75% of agreement or IQR ≤ 1 when a Likert scale is used. Results: Unilaterality, increased intraocular pressure (IOP), decreased corneal sensation and diffuse or sectoral iris atrophy are quite specific for HSV or VZV AU from consensus opinion. Sectoral iris atrophy is characteristic of HSV AU. Treatment initiation is highly variable, but most experts preferred valacyclovir owing to simpler dosing. Topical corticosteroids and beta-blockers should be used if necessary. Resolution of inflammation and normalisation of IOP are clinical endpoints. Conclusions: Consensus was reached on several aspects of diagnosis, choice of initial treatment, and treatment endpoints for HSV and VZV AU. Treatment duration and management of recurrences varied between experts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-67
Number of pages7
JournalEye (Basingstoke)
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2024

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