The estimation cut off point energy and protein intake to weight and length of birth based on maternal height

Azrimaidaliza, Kusharisupeni, Abas Basuni, Diah M. Utari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Energy intakes along pregnancy, especially women with underweight status have an effect to weight and length of birth. Recommended dietary requirement for Indonesian people, especially pregnant women is only for women with ideal weight and height. The aim of this study was to estimate cut off point of energy and protein intake and the impact to Weight and Length of Birth based on Maternal Height. Method: Prospective cohort design was used for estimating cut off point of energy and protein intake and the impact to weight and length of birth based on maternal height in Padang city. Total samples was 202 pregnant women. The subjects were recruited at their first trimester of pregnancy, when they came to health the centers for the first antenatal care. ROC curve analysis was employed in this study. Results: The result showed that cut off point energy and protein intake had variation in each trimester of pregnancy based on maternal height. Overall, pregnant women with energy intake below 1800 calories had a risk 1,7 times to deliver baby with birth weight below 3000 gram and protein intake below 65 gram had a risk 3,6 times to deliver baby with length of birth below 48 cm. Conclusion: We highly recommend the pregnant women to fulfill energy intake for more than 1800 calories and protein intake more than 65 grams so the pregnant women might deliver the babies with birth weight above 3000 gram and length of birth above 48 cm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3325-3328
Number of pages4
JournalAdvanced Science Letters
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Birth weight
  • Cut Off point
  • Energy intake
  • Length of birth
  • Protein intake

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