The effectivity of pharyngeal strengthening exercise, hyolaryngeal complex range of motion exercise, and swallowing practice in swallowing function of ischemic stroke patients with neurogenic dysphagia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dysphagia is associated with an increased risk of aspiration pneumonia which often results in death in stroke patients. Therefore, effective and efficient management is important. Behavioral therapy for swallowing rehabilitation based on the principles of neuroplasticity such as oropha-ryngeal strengthening and range of motion exercises are the alternative ones that often be used. This study aimed to assess the changes in swal-lowing function in ischemic stroke patients with neurogenic dysphagia after pharyngeal strengthening exercise, hyolaryngeal complex range of motion exercise and swallowing practice. Swallowing function was assessed using Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS) and Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) based on Flexible Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallow-ing before and after interventions. The interventions were given every day with a duration of 30-45 minutes for 4 weeks. There were six sub-jects who completed the study. The PAS before the interventions were 6.00±1.79 and after the interventions was 1.67±0.82 (P=0.003). Mean-while, the FOIS score before the interventions was 3 (1-5) and after the interventions were 5.00±2.10 (P=0.041). There was an improvement of PAS and FOIS after the interventions. Therefore, the interventions can be suggested to be used as one of the treatments to improve swallow-ing function in ischemic stroke patients with neurogenic dysphagia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)769-774
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Exercise Rehabilitation
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Dysphagia
  • Stroke
  • Swallowing

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