The effect of exposure to traffic related air pollutants in pregnancy on birth anthropometry: a cohort study in a heavily polluted low-middle income country

Frida Soesanti, Cuno S.P.M. Uiterwaal, Kees Meliefste, Jie Chen, Bert Brunekreef, Nikmah S. Idris, Diederick E. Grobbee, Kerstin Klipstein-Grobusch, Gerard Hoek

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ambient air pollution has been recognized as one of the most important environmental health threats. Exposure in early life may affect pregnancy outcomes and the health of the offspring. The main objective of our study was to assess the association between prenatal exposure to traffic related air pollutants during pregnancy on birth weight and length. Second, to evaluate the association between prenatal exposure to traffic related air pollutants and the risk of low birth weight (LBW). Methods: Three hundred forty mother-infant pairs were included in this prospective cohort study performed in Jakarta, March 2016–September 2020. Exposure to outdoor PM2.5, soot, NOx, and NO2 was assessed by land use regression (LUR) models at individual level. Multiple linear regression models were built to evaluate the association between air pollutants with birth weight (BW) and birth length (BL). Logistic regression was used to assess the risk of low birth weight (LBW) associated with all air pollutants. Results: The average PM2.5 concentration was almost eight times higher than the current WHO guideline and the NO2 level was three times higher. Soot and NOx were significantly associated with reduced birth length. Birth length was reduced by − 3.83 mm (95% CI -6.91; − 0.75) for every IQR (0.74 × 10− 5 per m) increase of soot, and reduced by − 2.82 mm (95% CI -5.33;-0.30) for every IQR (4.68 μg/m3) increase of NOx. Outdoor air pollutants were not significantly associated with reduced birth weight nor the risk of LBW. Conclusion: Exposure to soot and NOx during pregnancy was associated with reduced birth length. Associations between exposure to all air pollutants with birth weight and the risk of LBW were less convincing.

Original languageEnglish
Article number22
JournalEnvironmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

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