The Earlier Era of Eco-Technology: Pavilions at the Colonial Exhibition of Pasar Gambir and the 'Eastern-Western' Architectural Influences in the Netherlands Indies

Yulia Nurliani Lukito, Fildza Miranda

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper examines architecture in the Netherlands Indies and analyses how some innovation in the practice of architecture is actually coming from an adaptation to local conditions. It is in the notion of sustainable architecture not as a single entity of Western descendent but as loaded with cultural, historical and local contexts that this paper gravitates. As the discussion are pavilions in Pasar Gambir of Batavia - a temporary architecture practices - and ITB main hall that was designed with a strong connection to local conditions. During the Dutch colonial time in Indonesia there was already eco-technological practice in architecture with the aim to adapt to local conditions. The discussion of pavilions in Pasar Gambir showed some innovation in building forms, although temporary, that not only pushed the limit of building tradition but also created extraordinary event for colonial society. The discussion of ITB building illustrate the possibility of combining western-eastern architectural principles and surpassing the limit of architectural forms. In conclusion, the earlier of eco-technology in the Netherlands Indies has shown deeper cultural, historical and local meanings and how traditional architecture is related to the social and cultural dimensions of sustainability.

Original languageEnglish
Article number04042
JournalE3S Web of Conferences
Volume67
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Nov 2018
Event3rd International Tropical Renewable Energy Conference "Sustainable Development of Tropical Renewable Energy", i-TREC 2018 - Kuta, Bali, Indonesia
Duration: 6 Sep 20188 Sep 2018

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