The combination of nebulization and chest physiotherapy improved respiratory status in children with pneumonia

Nur Eni Lestari, Nani Nurhaeni, Siti Chodidjah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: There is controversy regarding the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy to solve airway obstruction problems experienced by children younger than five years of age with pneumonia. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy and nebulization on the respiratory status of these children. Method: This study was quasi-experimental with a pre- and post-test nonequivalent control group design. Thirty-four respondents selected by consecutive sampling were divided into two groups: one that received nebulization and one that received nebulization with chest physiotherapy. The independent t-test was used to analyze the effect of chest physiotherapy and nebulization on the respiratory status of children younger than age five with pneumonia. Results: There was a significant mean difference in heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation between the control and intervention group (p = 0.000). Despite the correlation between age and heart rate, other characteristics (nutritional status, exclusive breast-feeding, vaccination, the length of illness, and the content of nebulization medication) had no effect on heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation. Conclusions: The combination of nebulization and chest physiotherapy is more effective than nebulization only. It is important to reconsider the combination of nebulization and chest physiotherapy to overcome airway obstruction problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-22
Number of pages4
JournalEnfermeria Clinica
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Chest physiotherapy
  • Nebulization
  • Pneumonia
  • Respiratory status

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