The association between plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 and clinical outcome in paediatric sepsis

Antonius H. Pudjiadi, Kania Adhyanisitha, Hardiono D. Pusponegoro, Dadi E.M. Suyoko, Hindra I. Satari, Nastiti Kaswandani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

: Acute phase protein plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) is a key element in fibrinolysis inhibition in sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Elevated PAI-1 level is related to worse outcome in sepsis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between plasma PAI-1 level and clinical outcome in children with sepsis. A total of 35 children with sepsis were enrolled into this prospective study. Plasma PAI-1 was measured on day-1 and day-4. Systemic coagulation profile was measured on day-4. Individuals were followed up until 28 days. The mean PAI-1 from day-1 to day-4 in overt DIC children was not statistically significant. Contrarily, among nonovert DIC individuals, there was a significant difference (P ≤ 0.001) in PAI-1 levels on day-1 compared with day-4 were 95.25 ± 46.57 vs. 60.36 ± 37.31 ng/ml, respectively. Among survivors, mean PAI-1 level on day-1 was statistically higher than PAI-1 level on day-4 (82.47 ± 44.43 vs. 58.39 ± 32.98 ng/ml), P = 0.021. There was no significant difference between PAI-1 levels on day-1 compared with day-4 in nonsurvivors. PAI-1 was correlated to DIC score with r = 0.606 (P ≤ 0.001). PAI-1 levels significantly decreased on day-4 compared with day-1 among nonovert DIC individuals, and not in overt DIC individuals. Changes in PAI-1 levels in nonsurvivors did not differ. PAI-1 level was positively correlated with DIC score.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-381
Number of pages5
JournalBlood coagulation & fibrinolysis : an international journal in haemostasis and thrombosis
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2020

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