Subjectivity in Colonial Archives: A Case in Batavia Government's Instructions to the Sultan of Banten in Early XIX Century

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

On January 14th 1808, there was a change of power in the East Indies (the term for the Dutch East-Indies in early nineteenth century) from Governor-General Albertus Henricus Wiese to Herman Willem Daendels. The change of power was considered unusual since the position of governor-general had been always elected from one of the Dutch East-Indies’ officials. However, this time the governor-general came directly from Europe and had never served in the territory of this colony. In carrying out its duties, the new governor-general used instructions that had different structure from the previous period, which already had standard rules. In addition to the different structure of the letter, the instructions used words which had unusual connotations used in the preceding instructions created by Governor General Daendels. This paper would deal with subjectivity in colonial archive between 1808 and 1811, both from the sociolect and chronolect point of view. All words would be patterned in both type of language varieties and the connotation could be analyzed so that the tendencies would appear. The data which is used in this paper come from the Governor General’s instructions to The Sultan of Banten in the Dutch East Indies during 1808-1811.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventInternational Seminar on Sociolinguistics and Dialectology 2017 - ID, Depok, Indonesia
Duration: 1 Jan 2017 → …
http://elsevier.com/theconference

Conference

ConferenceInternational Seminar on Sociolinguistics and Dialectology 2017
Country/TerritoryIndonesia
CityDepok
Period1/01/17 → …
Internet address

Keywords

  • Structure, instruction, component of meaning, connotation, Javanese king.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Subjectivity in Colonial Archives: A Case in Batavia Government's Instructions to the Sultan of Banten in Early XIX Century'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this