Screening of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among elective surgery patients in referral hospital in Indonesia

Erni Juwita, Robert Sinto, Decy Subekti, Randy Adiwinata, Lia Waslia, Tonny Loho, Dodi Safari, Djoko Widodo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization is associated with serious surgical site infection in high-risk patients. High prevalence of MRSA colonization was reported in many settings, nonetheless local data is required. The purpose of this study is to identify the prevalence and risk factor of MRSA nasal carriage in adult patients in National Referral Hospital in Indonesia before underwent elective surgical procedure. Results: From 384 patients, 16.9% patients of them had undergone orthopaedic surgery, 51.3% had received antibiotics within the previous 3-month and 41.1% patients had history of hospitalization within the previous 1 year. Total of 21.6% patients were on invasive devices for at least 48 h before the operation; 24.2% had an open wound; 19.3% patients were referred from other hospital/ward. Of these patients, solid tumor without metastasis was the most common factor identified by the Charlson index (38.3%). Nasal colonization of Gram-positive bacteria was detected in 76.8%; S. aureus in 15.6% of patients (n = 60). MRSA was identified in three isolates (0.8%) by both culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. Due to low prevalence of MRSA nasal carriage, this finding supports the recommendation to not routinely apply mupirocin for nasal decolonization on patient planned for surgery in Indonesia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number56
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
  • Nasal colonization
  • Pre-operative

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