Relationship between the quantitative measurement of Tannerella forsythia on dental plaque and its relationship with the periodontal status of patients with coronary heart disease

Yuniarti Soeroso, Yulianti Kemal, Agus Widodo, Boy Bachtiar, Desire Pontoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pathogenesis of the development of atherosclerosis in subjects with coronary heart disease (CHD) has evolved to the extent where abnormal fat accumulation is no longer the culprit; rather, a certain inflammatory process, including periodontitis, has been deemed a major concern. Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative anaerobic bacteria that has a fusiform rod shape and has played a role in inducing the development of CHD and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze the difference in the quantitative measurement of Tannerella forsythia accumulated on plaque and the periodontal status of subjects with and without coronary heart disease. Tannerella forsythia was counted by utilizing real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The periodontal status of 66 CHD patients and 40 controls was obtained. Subgingival plaque was isolated. Tannerella forsythia levels were measured using real-time PCR. Tannerella forsythia levels of CHD patients (-6.29 log10 CFU/ml) was significantly different than the control (-19.63 log10 CFU/ml). Tannerella forsythia was not significantly associated with any periodontal status (p < 0.05). Tannerella forsythia levels of CHD patients were higher than the control patients. Tannerella forsythia was not associated with any periodontal status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1054-1060
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of International Dental and Medical Research
Volume11
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Periodontal status
  • Tannerella forsythia

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