Reflecting on Indonesia's young academy movement

Inaya Rakhmani, Arief Anshory Yusuf, Hasnawati Saleh, Zulfa Sakhiyya, Kanti Pertiwi, Sudirman Nasir, Herlambang P. Wiratraman, Berry Juliandi, Yanuar Nugroho, Jamaluddin Jompa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In the past three decades, there has been a rise in young academy movements in the Global North and South. Such movements, in at least Germany and the Netherlands, have been shown to be quite effective in connecting scientific work with society. Likewise, these movements share a common goal of developing interdisciplinary collaboration among young scientists, which contributes to the growth of a nation's-but also global-scientific endeavors. This paper focuses on the young academy movement in the fourth-largest country hosting the biggest Muslim population in the world, which is also the third-most populous democracy: Indonesia. We observe that there has been rising awareness among the young generation of scientists in Indonesia of the need to advocate for the use of sciences in responding to upcoming and current multidimensional crises. Science advocacy can be seen in their peer-based identification of Indonesia's future challenges, encompassing the fundamental areas for scientific inquiry, discovery, and intervention. We focus on the Indonesian Young Academy of Sciences (ALMI) and its network of young scientists. We describe ALMI's science communication practice, specifically SAINS45 and Science for Indonesia's Biodiversity, and how they have been useful for policymakers, media, and school engagements. The article closes with a reflection on future directions for the young academy movement in Indonesia and beyond.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2307213121
Pages (from-to)e2307213121
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume121
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Apr 2024

Keywords

  • Indonesia
  • science advocacy
  • science communication
  • science to policy
  • young academy movement

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