Psychometric properties of the Indonesian Ten-item Internet Gaming Disorder Test and a latent class analysis of gamer population among youths

Kristiana Siste, Enjeline Hanafi, Lee Thung Sen, Reza Damayanti, Evania Beatrice, Raden Irawati Ismail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Internet gaming disorder (IGD) is a rising health concern. Indonesia has yet to have any validated instrument specifically designed to screen for this disorder. This study aims to validate the Indonesian version of the Ten-item Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT-10) and conduct a latent class analysis of gamers among the youth. An online survey was conducted between October and December 2020 at two universities in Depok and Jakarta, Indonesia. In total, 1233 respondents (62.6% female and 20.3±1.90 years old) gave valid responses and played video games. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) confirmed the unidimensional structure of the scale. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.72 and composite reliability was 0.92. The latent class analysis yielded three distinct classes of gamers. The continuation and negative consequences were highly distinctive for the group at high risk of IGD (class 3). Deception had the lowest endorsement rate (41.7%); while, the continuation domain had the highest endorsement, 91.2%. The IGD prevalence estimate was 1.90% among the respondents. Approximately 70.2% of the gamers did not show IGD symptoms. The adapted Indonesian IGDT-10 was demonstrated as valid and reliable among Indonesian youths. Consistent with previous studies, the deception domain had a low endorsement rate. The detected IGD rates were comparable to the global range. The majority of the current sample disclosed no symptoms; however, a considerable proportion would benefit from early preventive measures.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0269528
JournalPloS one
Volume17
Issue number6 June
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

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