Psychological Health of Surgeons in a Time of COVID-19: A Global Survey

Yi Quan Tan, Ziting Wang, Qai Ven Yap, Yiong Huak Chan, Roger C. Ho, Agus Rizal Ardy Hariandy Hamid, Aitor Landaluce-Olavarria, Gianluca Pellino, Vineet Gauhar, Manish Chand, Marcelo Langer Wroclawski, Bm Zeeshan Hameed, Samuel Ka Kin Ling, Shomik Sengupta, Gaetano Gallo, Peter Ka Fung Chiu, Yiloren Tanidir, M. Pilar Villanova Tallada, Bernardo Nunez Garcia, Ramiro ColleoniZainal Adwin Zainal Abiddin, Riccardo Campi, Francesco Esperto, Diego Carrion, Dean Elterman, Amanda Shu Jun Chung, Anthony Chi Fai Ng, Marco Moschini, Juan Gomez Rivas, Julio Mayol, Jeremy Yuen Chun Teoh, Edmund Chiong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the degree of psychological impact among surgical providers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Summary of Background Data: The COVID-19 pandemic has extensively impacted global healthcare systems. We hypothesized that the degree of psychological impact would be higher for surgical providers deployed for COVID-19 work, certain surgical specialties, and for those who knew of someone diagnosed with, or who died, of COVID-19. Methods: We conducted a global web-based survey to investigate the psychological impact of COVID-19. The primary outcomes were the depression anxiety stress scale-21 and Impact of Event Scale-Revised scores. Results: A total of 4283 participants from 101 countries responded. 32.8%, 30.8%, 25.9%, and 24.0% screened positive for depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD respectively. Respondents who knew someone who died of COVID-19 were more likely to screen positive for depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD (OR 1.3, 1.6, 1.4, 1.7 respectively, all P < 0.05). Respondents who knew of someone diagnosed with COVID-19 were more likely to screen positive for depression, stress, and PTSD (OR 1.2, 1.2, and 1.3 respectively, all P < 0.05). Surgical specialties that operated in the head and neck region had higher psychological distress among its surgeons. Deployment for COVID- 19-related work was not associated with increased psychological distress. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic may have a mental health legacy outlasting its course. The long-term impact of this ongoing traumatic event underscores the importance of longitudinal mental health care for healthcare personnel, with particular attention to those who know of someone diagnosed with, or who died of COVID-19.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-56
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume277
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2023

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • COVID-19
  • depression
  • pandemic
  • post-traumatic stress disorder
  • psychological health
  • stress

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