Prophylactic and therapeutic suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by a novel bifunctional peptide inhibitor

Naoki Kobayashi, Paul Kiptoo, Hitomi Kobayashi, Rahmawati Ridwan, Stefan Brocke, Teruna J. Siahaan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective was to optimize and evaluate the in vivo activities of our novel bifunctional peptide inhibitor (BPI), which alters immune response in autoimmune diseases by modulating the immunological synapse formation. Previously, we have designed PLP-BPI and GAD-BPI by conjugating myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139-151 and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)208-217, respectively, with CD11a237-246 via a spacer peptide. PLP-BPI and GAD-BPI suppressed the disease progression in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and in type-1 diabetes, respectively. In this study, various PLP-BPI derivatives were synthesized and evaluated in the EAE model. Intravenous injections of PLP-BPI derivatives prevented the disease progression more efficiently than did unmodified PLP-BPI. Production of IL-17, a potent proinflammatory cytokine found commonly among MS patients, was significantly low in Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2-treated mice. Treatment given after the disease onset could dramatically ameliorate the disease. BPI induced anaphylactic responses at a lower incidence than PLP139-151. In conclusion, PLP-BPI derivatives can effectively suppress the disease severity and morbidity of EAE by post-onset therapeutic treatment as well as prophylactic use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-79
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Immunology
Volume129
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2008

Keywords

  • Anaphylactic response
  • Autoimmune disease
  • Bifunctional peptide inhibitor
  • Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
  • IL-17
  • Immunological synapse
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Peptide
  • Proteolipid protein
  • Therapy

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