Phytochemical, in vitro radical scavenging and in vivo oxidative stress analysis of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) leaves extract

Rosmalena, Nabilla Aretharify Putri, Fatmawaty Yazid, Neneng Siti Silfi Ambarwati, Hanita Omar, Islamudin Ahmad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This current work aims to determine phytochemicals, in vitro radical scavenging, and in vivo oxidative stress reduction activities of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) ethanolic extract (PEE). The Clule method was used to determine the phytochemical content. An in vitro antioxidant with radical scavenging activity was measured using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. An in vivo antioxidant with oxidative stress reduction was carried out for 10 days on 25 male Sprague-Dawley rats (divided into five groups). Every day, each group was given positive control, negative control, 5, 10, and 20 mg/200 gr of body weight (BW) of the extract. The blood plasma was taken for malondialdehyde analysis. A phytochemical identification of PEE revealed more compounds, such as flavonoids, alkaloids, steroids, essential oils, and tannin. PEE exhibits significant in vitro radical scavenging activity, with an IC 50 value of 126.695 μg/mL. In the in vivo antioxidant with oxidative stress reduction experiments, 5 mg/200 gr BW was the most effective dose, as evidenced by a considerable drop in malondialdehyde level (0.312 nmol/mL) after and before treatment. In conclusion, PPE has the potential to be developed as a herbal antioxidant based on in vitro and in vivo test results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-137
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology and Research
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2022

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • fifty percent inhibition concentration
  • malondialdehyde level
  • peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) extract
  • phytochemical

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