Parenting Style, Child Emotion Regulation and Behavioral Problems: The Moderating Role of Cultural Values in Australia and Indonesia

Divna Haslam, Chrislyne Poniman, Ania Filus, Agnes Sumargi, Lia Boediman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research has shown that the congruence of parenting styles with cultural values, rather than parenting styles alone, impacts child adjustment. This study examined if parents’ cultural values moderate the relationships between parenting styles and child outcomes across both an individualist culture (Australia) and a collectivist culture (Indonesia). Three hundred and eighty-seven parents of 2–10-year-old children from both countries reported their parenting styles, the importance of the collectivistic values (security, conformity, and tradition), and their child's emotion regulation and behavioral problems. In both countries, authoritative parenting was associated with higher child emotion regulation and lower levels of behavioral problems, and authoritarian parenting was associated with lower child emotion regulation and higher levels of behavioral problems. Although cultural values did not moderate the relationship between authoritarian parenting and child adjustment, in both countries greater importance placed on tradition attenuated the positive effect of authoritative parenting on child outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)320-342
Number of pages23
JournalMarriage and Family Review
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 May 2020

Keywords

  • Child behavioral problems
  • child emotion regulation
  • cultural values
  • parenting
  • parenting styles

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