Parenteral antibiotic usage patterns and effects of intravenous to oral switching on the length and cost of hospitalization

Rengganis Pranandari, Sudibyo Supardi, Retnosari Andrajati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The prolonged use of intravenous antibiotics might increase the length and cost of hospitalization. The research objective, therefore, was to evaluate the effect of switching antibiotics on the length of hospital stay and hospitalization cost. The prospective cohort research design was adopted. The inclusion criteria were in patients who had received intravenous antibiotics. Methods: The sample comprised 39 patients who switched antibiotics as an exposed group and 39 patients who did not switch as an unexposed group. The data were collected using the patient medical records and the financial data from the hospital information system. The Mann–Whitney test and Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was applied in the analysis. Results: The results revealed that the antibiotics most commonly switched were intravenous ceftriaxone (83.3%) and oral cefixime (94.8%). From the five switching patterns observed, the most common switch was from intravenous ceftriaxone to oral cefixime in patients with acute gastroenteritis. All antibiotics were administered in accordance with the National Formulary (NF) guidelines. Only metronidazole (5 mg/ml dose) was inconsistent with NF. Switching antibiotics did not impact the length of hospital stay and hospitalization cost; however, comorbidities did have an influence here. Conclusions: Further, switching antibiotics impacted the duration over which intravenous antibiotics were administered and the cost of antibiotics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-89
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Cost
  • Length of stay
  • Switching antibiotics

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