Nursing students' and faculty members' experiences of online education during COVID-19 across Southeast Asia: A Photovoice study

Wipada Kunaviktikul, Emily Ang, Ns Syamikar Baridwan, Alexandra Belle Bernal, Luz Barbara P. Dones, Jo Leah Flores, Rachel Freedman-Doan, Areewan Klunklin, Wan Ling Lee, Chia Chin Lin, Tzu Tsun Luk, Anh T.H. Nguyen, Mohd Said Nurumal, Agus Setiawan, Thandar Soe Sumaiyah Jamaluddin, T. Q. Huy, Patraporn Tungpunkom, Ns Dwi Nurviyandari Kusuma Wati, Xinyi Xu, Shefaly Shorey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused extraordinary disruptions to education systems globally, forcing a rapid switch from conventional to online education. Although some qualitative studies have been carried out exploring the online education experiences of nursing students and faculty members during the COVID-19 pandemic, to our knowledge, no study has used the Photovoice approach. Objectives: To explore the experiences of nursing students and faculty members as related to online education during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design: A descriptive qualitative design using Photovoice was adopted. Setting: The study took place across five countries and one city in Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, and Hong Kong). Participants: Fifty-two nursing students and twenty-eight nursing faculty members who participated in online education during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Each participant submitted one photo substantiated with written reflections. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Ethical approval was obtained from institution-specific ethics boards. Results: Three themes and eleven sub-themes emerged from the data. The three main themes were: 1) Psychological roadblocks to online education; 2) Developing resilience despite adversities; and 3) Online education: What worked and what did not. Conclusion: Through Photovoice, the reflections revealed that nursing students and faculty members were generally overwhelmed with the online education experience. At the same time, participants were satisfied with the flexibility and convenience, opportunities for professional and personal development and safety afforded by online education. However, concerns over academic integrity, practical skills and clinical competencies, engagement and participation, the duality of technology and social isolation out-shadowed the advantages. It is worthwhile to explore the concerns raised to enhance online education across the nursing curriculum.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105307
JournalNurse Education Today
Volume111
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • Nursing faculty
  • Nursing students
  • Online education
  • Pandemic
  • Photovoice

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