Military Reform in the Post-New Order Indonesia: A Transitional or a New Subtle Role in Indonesian Democracy?

Meidi Kosandi, Subur Wahono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article examines the role of the military in Indonesian democracy since 1998. After 20 years of democratic reforms, it appears that the military has not executed all necessary reform agendas toward a professional military. Using qualitative research, this article questions how the new form of military role in politics was formed and how it contributes to the formation of Indonesian democracy today. It argues that the historical process of political interactions between actors has affected the formation of civil-military relations. Indonesian military successfully maintained its power and leverage in politics by securitization and elegant power play with the elites. Civilian elites had to leave military reform agenda to the military and accept their dependence on military support to secure power. This situation has so far ensured military informal power and halted reform for professional military.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)224-241
Number of pages18
JournalAsian Politics and Policy
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2020

Keywords

  • civil-military relations
  • civilian control
  • Indonesia
  • military reform
  • professional military

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