Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 improves feeding intolerance in preterm infants

Risma K. Kaban, Wardhana, Badriul Hegar, Rinawati Rohsiswatmo, Setyo Handryastuti, Novie Amelia, Dina Muktiarti, Flavia Indrio, Yvan Vandenplas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Feeding tolerance is extremely important in preterm infants. This study aimed to evaluate whether preterm infants receiving Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 would develop fewer symptoms of feeding intolerance. Secondary outcomes were duration of parenteral nutrition, time to reach full feeding, length of hospital stay, sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), diarrhea, and mortality. Methods: This double-blind randomized controlled trial of L. reuteri DSM 17938 versus placebo included 94 neonates with a gestational age of 28-34 weeks and birth weight of 1,000-1,800 g. Results: Feeding intolerance (vomiting and/or distension) was less common in the probiotic group than in the placebo group (8.5% vs. 25.5%; relative risk, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.96; p=0.03). No significant intergroup differences were found in proven sepsis, time to reach full feeding, length of hospital stay, or diarrhea. The prevalence of NEC (stages 2 and 3) was 6.4% in the placebo group vs. 0% in the probiotic group (relative risk, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.15; p=0.24). Mortality rates were 2.1% in the probiotic group and 8.5% in the placebo group, p=0.36). Conclusion: The administration of L. reuteri DSM 17938 to preterm infants was safe and significantly reduced feeding intolerance. No significant differences were found in any other secondary outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)545-553
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Feeding intolerance
  • Lactobacillus reuteri
  • Preterm

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