Investigating the Food-Based Domestic Materiality of Nuaulu People, Seram Island: The Multiple Roles of Sago

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Abstract

This paper employs the perspective of food as the basis of understanding domestic materiality in a vernacular context. Current discourse of domestic materiality tends to perceive understanding of material within a localised and enclosed context. Food demonstrates a potential to expand such arrangement, bridging the connection between domestic and the wider context, arguably demonstrating a better understanding of sustainable materiality Similarly, the study's focus on vernacular context is also influenced by the multiple roles of food in such a context, demonstrating a tight strong interrelationship of nature and culture. This paper focuses on the exploration of food-based of domestic materiality of the Nuaulu people, employing data from a field observation in the Sepa and Rohua Village, Seram Island. Sago becomes the particular focus of this study as it is a significant native plant that is used both for the sustenance and social-cultural life of the Nualu people. The study highlights the rituals, social process, and territorialisation aspects happening in sago related activities in the tribes. This paper highlights that the interrelationship of these aspects demonstrates a sense of identity for the Nuaulu people, arguably illustrating the multidimensional and sustainable characteristics of sago as part of the tribe's domestic materiality.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012115
JournalJournal of Physics: Conference Series
Volume1351
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Dec 2019
EventUniversitas Riau International Conference on Science and Environment 2019, URICSE 2019 - Pekanbaru, Indonesia
Duration: 10 Sep 2019 → …

Keywords

  • domestic materiality
  • Food
  • sago
  • vernacular context

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