Integration of vitamin A supplementation with the expanded program on immunization does not affect seroconversion to oral poliovirus vaccine in infants

Richard D. Semba, Muhilal, Nasrin E.G. Mohgaddam, Zakiudin Munasir, Arwin Ali Purbaya Akib, Dewi Permaesih, Muherdiyantiningsih, Albert Osterhaus

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21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Childhood immunization programs may provide infrastructure for delivering vitamin A supplements to infants in developing countries. The effect of giving vitamin A, an immune enhancer, on antibody responses to trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine [TOPV) is unknown. A randomized, double- blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to determine the effect of giving vitamin A simultaneously with TOPV on antibody responses to poliovirus. infants (n = 467) received oral vitamin A, 15 mg retinol equivalent (RE), 7.5 mg RE or placebo with TOPV at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. Antibody responses to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were measured by a microvirus neutralization assay at enrollment and at 9 mo of age. Seroconversion rates to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 ranged from 98 to 100% in the three treatment groups, and there were no differences in mean antibody titers to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 among treatment groups. This study demonstrates that oral vitamin A does not affect antibody responses to poliovirus vaccine when integrated with the Expanded Program on Immunization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2203-2205
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume129
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 8 Dec 1999

Keywords

  • Immunization
  • Infants
  • Poliovirus
  • Vaccine
  • Vitamin A

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