Instability treatment due to upper cervical tuberculous spondylitis

Singkat Dohar Apul Lumban Tobing, Rendra Irawan, Mohammad Triadi Wijaya, Aji Antoro, Eko Setiawan, Rian Septian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Upper Cervical Spondylitis is a rare case, approximately 0.3–1% of all Tuberculous Spondylitis. Nevertheless, it causes destruction and morbidity more than Tuberculous Spondylitis at other side. Instability at upper cervical make patient cannot perform loadbearing activity. Treatments consist of anterior debridement with fusion and posterior stabilization is one of treatment that present good outcome. This study has been reported in line with the SCARE criteria (Fang et al., 1983) [1]. Material and method: We collected the data A 22 years old young man with chief complaint of severe pain on his neck since 1 year before admission. And this work has been reported in line with the SCARE criteria. He was diagnosed Tuberculous Spondylitis at C1–C2 and C6–C7 and got debridement, decompression and posterior stabilization and fusion also with occipital plate, lateral mass and long rods. Result: Performing debridement, decompression, posterior stabilization and fusion using occipital plate, lateral mass and rods as a treatment for Upper Cervical Tuberculous Spondylitis give promising outcome. For increasing functional outcome, patient got sensoric and motoric exercise by physiotherapy Conclusion: Upper cervical treatment with debridement, decompression, posterior stabilization and fusion using occipital plate, lateral mass and rods give optimal outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-270
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Surgery Case Reports
Volume61
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Cervical infection pathophysiology
  • Outcome upper cervical tuberculous spondylitis
  • Upper cervical tuberculous spondylitis

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