Hydrogen adsorption behavior of mechanically milled and pelletized coconut shell activated carbon

Sri Harjanto., Stefanno Widy Yunior, Siti Chodijah, Nasruddin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Activated carbon can be the best selection for the solid media of hydrogen storage materials because of cheap, good availability, high quantity of pore on its surface and good adsorption capacity. To obtain optimal handling of coconut charcoal-based (CSAC) without reducing its property on hydrogen adsorption capacity, the effect of mechanochemical and pelletizing process to CSAC was examined. Mechanical milling by using planetary ball mill was conducted to reduce particle size distribution and to mechanochemically process CSAC with KOH. CSAC particles reduce its particle size distribution to nano- and submicron-size due to mechanical milling. After mechanochemical and pelletizing process, the surface area and pore volume of CSAC decrease to 68.5% and 61% compared with those of as received sample. However, hydrogen adsorption capacity of CSAC pellet only decrease 5 and 9% at measurement pressure and temperature of 4000 kPa, -5°C and 4000 kPa, 25°C, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNanotechnology Applications in Energy and Environment
Pages98-104
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Feb 2013
EventSymposium on Nanotechnology Applications in Energy and Environment 2012, NAEE 2012 - Bandung, Indonesia
Duration: 20 Sep 201221 Sep 2012

Publication series

NameMaterials Science Forum
Volume737
ISSN (Print)0255-5476

Conference

ConferenceSymposium on Nanotechnology Applications in Energy and Environment 2012, NAEE 2012
CountryIndonesia
CityBandung
Period20/09/1221/09/12

Keywords

  • Activated carbon
  • Coconut shell
  • Hydrogen storage
  • Isothermal volumetric adsorption
  • Mechanochemical
  • Pelletizing

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