Gendered community-based waste management and the feminization of environmental responsibility in Greater Jakarta, Indonesia

Diana Teresa Pakasi, Anita Hardon, Irwan Martua Hidayana, Putri Rahmadhani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article investigates gender dynamics in the practices of community-based waste management in households and local communities in the Greater Jakarta region of Indonesia, using a Feminist Political Ecology framework. We argue that community-based waste management, which was established as a decentralized waste management system, reinforces gender inequality by relying on women feeling responsible for waste management in their homes and communities and doing related care work. While our focused ethnographic studies in Bogor District, Tangerang City, and Depok City in 2021–2022 found diverse local waste management systems involving both formal and informal enterprises, the practices across these sites were clearly gendered, with women engaged in underpaid care work. We trace this gendered division of labor to the continued influence of ibuism, the ideology of the Indonesian state that deems women responsible for household and community hygiene, in effect feminizing environmental responsibility. We argue that, to become truly sustainable, waste management practices must be designed with men and women in communities, and address various forms of gender inequality and the gendered impact of community waste practices on health.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGender, Technology and Development
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • community-based waste management
  • feminization of environmental responsibility
  • Gendered waste management
  • health
  • plastic waste

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