Erratum: In a relationship: Sister species in mixed colonies, with a description of new Chikunia species (Theridiidae) (Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society (2019) DOI: 10.1093/zoolinnean/zly083)

Cassandra Smith, Addie Cotter, Lena Grinsted, Anom Bowolaksono, Ni Luh Watiniasih, Ingi Agnarsson

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

In the originally published version of this article the new description of Chikunia bilde Smith, Agnarsson, and Grinsted, 2019, did not contain information on the location of the holotype, necessary for acceptance of the name into zoological nomenclature. This missing information has now been added to the article. Please also find it below. Chikunia bilde Smith, Agnarss on, & Grinsted SP. NOV. (Smith et al. 2019, p. 345) Type material Male holotype from northern central Bali, near lake Beretan, -8.271211, 115.165842, collected in July 2017, legit L. Grinsted, in the Smithsonian MNH, Washington DC. Diagnosis (Smith et al. 2019, p. 345) Chikunia bilde differs from Chikunia nigra in the blunt terminus of the male abdomen (Smith et al. 2019, fig. 7H, I) and in the male leg coloration that gives legs a stripy appearance (yellow-brown stripes; Fig. 1G). Furthermore, C. bilde differs in the conformation of male palp with embolus covering the tegulum almost entirely, and short and transparent conductor (Smith et al. 2019, figs 7J, 8), and in having a conspicuous epigynum with oval to round spermathecae and spiralling copulatory ducts (Smith et al. 2019, fig. 7A–L). In habitus, C. bilde females tend to have larger bulbous abdominal humps than C. nigra. Furthermore, C. bilde females differ from C. nigra by lacking the dark brown or black tarsus of leg I.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
JournalZoological Journal of the Linnean Society
Volume187
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Nov 2019

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