Enhancing the CO2/CH4 Separation Properties of Cellulose Acetate Membranes Using Polyethylene Glycol Methyl Ether Acrylate Radiation Grafting

Arifina Febriasari, Meri Suhartini, Rahmawati, Baity Hotimah, Niken H. Anggarini, Ade L. Yunus, Rika F. Hermana, Deswita, Fitrilia Silvianti, Dina Maniar, Katja Loos, Aliya Fahira, Irma P. Permatasari, Sutrasno Kartohardjono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Polymer-based membrane separation technology is gaining popularity due to its cost-effectiveness and operational simplicity. Cellulose acetate (CA) stands out as an attractive biobased polymer for membrane applications due to its remarkable mechanical properties and ease of manufacturing. To improve the selectivity of CA-based membranes for carbon dioxide (CO2) separation, the incorporation of polyethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate (PEGMEA), known for its CO2 absorption properties, has emerged as a promising approach for creating high-performance membrane materials with low operating pressure. This study provides insight into the production of PEGMEA-grafted CA membranes via gamma radiation and their performance for CO2/CH4 gas separation. CO2 permeation of the obtained CA-PEGMEA membranes was successfully improved and achieved the desired selectivity for CO2/CH4 separation. A comprehensive study of the membrane properties was conducted, encompassing structural characterization, surface analysis, permeability, selectivity, thermal analysis, and crystallinity, which are essential for understanding and assessing the membrane’s performance. This work emphasizes gamma radiation graft polymerization and shows its applicability for high-performance gas separation membrane materials.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Polymers and the Environment
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • Cellulose acetate membrane
  • CO separation
  • Fixed carrier membrane
  • Polyethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate
  • Radiation grafting

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