Effectiveness of Electroacupuncture for Management of Young Patients with Overactive Bladder at 1-Year Follow-Up

Newanda Johni Muchtar, Dwi Rachma Helianthi, Irma Nareswari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Overactive bladder (OAB) is defined as urgency (a sudden compelling desire to pass urine with or without urge incontinence) usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB is a chronic condition that affects quality of life (QoL) significantly in patients. Acupuncture can help in the treatment of OAB for patients who cannot take certain medications. Case: A 32-year-old a female patient was diagnosed with OAB. She came to the department of medical acupuncture with a chief complaint of frequent urination for 15 years. Urinalysis test results were normal. Before acupuncture, a bladder ultrasound (US) showed a postvoid residual volume (PVR) of 53 mL, and a uroflowmetry test showed a maximum flow rate of 20.6 mL/s, with an average flow rate of 12.1 mL/s and a voided volume of 71 mL. Her OAB Symptom Score (OABSS) was 13 and the King's Health Questionnaire result was (KHQ) was 87. She was treated with electroacupuncture (EA). Results: After 12 EA sessions, 3 times per week, this patient's bladder US showed a PVR of 3 mL; a uroflowmetry test showed a maximum flow rate of 30.5 mL/s, with an average flow rate of 15.3 mL/s and a voided volume of 120 mL. Her OABSS score was 7. Her KHQ score was 0. Conclusions: OAB can be treated with EA to improve QoL, as seen by this patient's decreasing OABSS and KHQ scores, reduced PVR, and increase the voided volume.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-174
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Acupuncture
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • acupuncture
  • bladder hyperactivity
  • electroacupuncture
  • incontinence
  • nocturia
  • Overactive bladder

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