Effect of logo-therapy, acceptance, commitment therapy, family psychoeducation on self-stigma, and depression on housewives living with HIV/AIDS

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Self-stigma in people living with HIV/AIDS is a survival mechanism to protect themselves from external stigma. Stigma and discrimination in people living with HIV/AIDS can lead to inequality in social life. This inequality can cause inferiority complex, preoccupation, and denial of diagnosis, which correlates with the onset of depression. This study aims to determine the effect of logotherapy, commitment acceptance therapy, and family psychoeducation on self-stigma and depression on housewives living with HIV/AIDS. Method: This study used the quasi-experiment pretest–posttest design. The respondents were selected using the purposive sampling technique. The subjects were 60 housewives living with HIV/AIDS. Data were collected using Internalizes Stigma of AIDS Tools and analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses. Equality analysis was conducted using the chi-square test and independent t test, and the effects were analyzed using paired t test. Results: The result showed a significant decrease in self-stigma and depression (p value < 0.05) in patients receiving logotherapy, commitment acceptance therapy, and family psychoeducation. Conclusions: A combination of logotherapy, commitment acceptance therapy, and family psychoeducation is recommended as a therapy package to overcome self-stigma and depression for people living with HIV/AIDS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-101
Number of pages4
JournalEnfermeria Clinica
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Acceptance and commitment therapy
  • Family psychoeducation
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Logo therapy
  • Self-stigma

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