Effect of four weeks of 5:2 intermittent fasting on energy intake and body mass index among obese male students aged 18-25

Hadiyati Fudla, Ninik Mudjihartini, Helda Khusun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Obesity is a consequence of the metabolic morbidities caused by overconsumption and lack of physical activity. Etiologically, obesity should be preventable, but reviews show that no country has yet been successful in reducing obesity, even though many efforts have been taken around the globe. This study aimed to assess effects of two non-consecutive days fasting per week on energy intake and body mass index (BMI) among obese male students aged 18–25 years at Universitas Indonesia. The collected data including demographic data, anthropometric, socio-economic status, and self-perception of obesity were used as additional information about obesity incidence as the descriptive data. A randomized controlled trial study was conducted on 40 obese male students. Their habitual intake six months before the study was measured through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The BMI was measured using a bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Intervention group did two non-consecutive days fasting per week, and recorded their fasting intake by food record diary; while control group did their habitual eating as before, and being recorded by three days 24-h recall. After a four-week intervention, the intervention group saw a significant reduction (P < 0.005) in energy intake and BMI. IF that properly followed the 5:2 protocol reduced energy intake and BMI among obese male students aged 18–25 at Universitas Indonesia in a four-week intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100353
JournalObesity Medicine
Volume25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Calorie restriction
  • Diet
  • Intermittent fasting
  • Obesity
  • Weight reduction

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