Consumption patterns of sweetened condensed milk in the diet of young Indonesian children and its potential nutritional health consequences

Mohammad Juffrie, Ratu Ayu Dewi Sartika, Roy Alexander Sparringa, Lindawati Wibowo, Widjaja Lukito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This critical review is intended to analyse the existing studies on the consumption patterns of sweetened condensed milk in the diet of young Indonesian children and its potential nutritional health consequences. Considering its limited nutritional value and high sugar content, sweetened condensed milk (SCM) should not be administered to young children (1-3 years old) with the goal of promoting their growth and development. However, such false practice has been reported in mostly urban studies among the underprivileged population. Conclusive scientific evidence is also still lacking regarding the health risks of long-term SCM consumption by young Indonesian children at early ages, as no study has focused on this specific topic. Nevertheless, inadequate understanding of SCM, its consumption patterns, and its long-term effects on health among young Indonesian children have been implicated in public confusion on the topic. Ongoing disparities that exist between regulation, industrial practices, and product advertisement have led to poor understanding in communities, which, to a considerable extent, has contributed to difficulties in segregating data on the consumption of SCM and its related products. Analogous to sugar-sweetened beverages, limited SCM consumption can be recommended when appropriately implemented with active monitoring and evaluation of product advertisements and product labeling, enforcement of regulations, and provision of effective customer education.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-26
Number of pages11
JournalAsia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

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