Comparison between mini mental state examination (MMSE) and Montreal cognitive assessment Indonesian version (MoCA-Ina) as an early detection of cognitive impairments in post-stroke patients

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Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is defined as cognitive impairment that may never develop into dementia. Cognitive impairment is one long-term complication of a stroke. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), which is commonly used as a screening tool for cognitive impairment, has a low sensitivity to detect cognitive impairment, especially MCI. Alternatively, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Indonesian version (MoCA-Ina) has been reported to have a higher sensitivity than the MMSE. The aim of this study was to compare the proportion of MCI identified between the MMSE and MoCA-Ina in stroke patients. This was a cross-sectional study of stroke outpatients who attended the Polyclinic Neuromuscular Division, Rehabilitation Department, and Polyclinic Stroke, Neurology Department Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta. The proportion of MCI identified using the MMSE was 31.03% compared to 72.41% when using the MoCA-Ina. This difference was statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.033). The proportion of MCI in stroke patients was higher when using the MoCA-Ina compared to the MMSE. The MoCA-Ina should be used as an alternative in the early detection of MCI in stroke patients, especially those undergoing rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012153
JournalJournal of Physics: Conference Series
Volume884
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Aug 2017
Event1st Physics and Technologies in Medicine and Dentistry Symposium, PTMDS 2017 - Depok, West Java, Indonesia
Duration: 15 Jul 201716 Jul 2017

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