Combining Natural Ingredients and Beliefs: The Dayak Tribe’s Experience Caring for Sick Children with Traditional Medicine

Shinta Widiastuty Anggerainy, Dessie Wanda, Happy Hayati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Instead of seeking conventional health care, the Dayak tribe in Borneo, Indonesia, treats sick children at home with traditional medicine. The objective of this descriptive, qualitative study was to explore the Dayak tribe’s use of traditional medicine to care for sick children. Comprehensive interviews were conducted with 10 caregivers, with collected data analyzed using content analysis. Key recurring themes identified were: 1) traditional medicine as first aid; 2) ease of access and cost-effectiveness; 3) traditional medicine was not always effective; 4) a combination of natural ingredients and beliefs; 5) the importance of “communicating” with plants; and 6) engagement with metaphysical forces. Health professionals should respect familial cultures’ beliefs regarding the provision of health care at home. Furthermore, they need to develop competency in performing cultural assessments and providing information to these parents on the risks of not seeking professional emergency care for children with conditions that can’t be handled at home with traditional medicine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-36
Number of pages8
JournalComprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing
Volume40
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Dayak tribe
  • experience
  • sick children
  • traditional medicine (TM)

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