Chewing gum is more effective than saline-solution gargling for reducing oral mucositis

Kadek Cahya Utami, Happy Hayati, Allenidekania

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This quasi-experimental study compared the effectiveness of chewing gum and gargling with a saline solution as two types of intervention to reduce oral mucositis scores. Method: The sample consisted of 44 children who were divided into two groups, one of which chewed gum, and the other gargled with a saline solution. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the data. Results: There was a significant difference (p = 0.001) in post-intervention oral-mucositis scores. The significant mean difference between the groups indicated that the decreased oral mucositis scores for the chewing gum group was more substantial than for the group gargling with a saline solution (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The data showed that chewing gum is more effective than gargling with a saline solution, and it can be incorporated into the nursing protocol for treating pediatric cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-8
Number of pages4
JournalEnfermeria Clinica
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

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