Changes in the human footprint in and around Indonesia’s terrestrial national parks between 2012 and 2017

Asri A. Dwiyahreni, Habiburrachman A.H. Fuad, Sunaryo Muhtar, T. E.Budhi Soesilo, Chris Margules, Jatna Supriatna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The human footprint (HF) was developed to measure of the impact of human activities on the environment. The human footprint has been found to be closely related to the vulnerability of protected areas around the world. In Indonesia, as nature conservation is still seen as hindering economic development, it is especially important to assess the human footprint in order to comprehend the overall pressures resulting from the various human activities on Indonesia’s national parks. This study measured the change in the human footprint in and around 43 terrestrial national parks over 5 years, between 2012 and 2017. As many as 37 out of 43 NPs experienced an increase in the HF, ranging from 0.4 to 77.3%. Tanjung Puting in Kalimantan experienced the greatest increase (77.3%), while Ujung Kulon in Jawa Bali bioregion had the greatest decrease (10.5%). An increase in human population density and improved access to parks from roads, rivers and coastlines are the main drivers of increasing impacts on national parks.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4510
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

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