Cardiovascular Protection Variables Based on Exercise Intensity in Stable Coronary Heart Disease Patients After Coronary Stenting: A Comparative Study

Dyana Sarvasti, Isabella Lalenoh, Emanoel Oepangat, Budhi Setianto Purwowiyoto, Anwar Santoso, Rochmad Romdoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Our study aimed at determining and comparing the mechanism of cardiovascular protection variables in moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) after coronary stenting. Participants and Methods: This experimental study used the same subject and cross-over design, involving eleven stable CHD patients after coronary stenting. These were randomly divided into two groups; MICT for 29 minutes at 50-60% heart rate reserve and HIIT with 4x4 minute intervals at 60-80% heart rate reserve, each followed by three minutes of active recovery at 40-50% heart rate reserve. These were conducted three times a week for two weeks. The participants' levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) activity assayed, and flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) were examined before and after treatments were completed. Results: The HIIT significantly increased the levels of noradrenaline and eNOS compared with MICT (p<0.05). Also, HIIT was better in maintaining EC-SOD activity and FMD compared with MICT (p<0.05). Through the noradrenalin pathway, HIIT had a direct and significant effect on eNOS and FMD (p<0.05) but MICT, through the noradrenaline pathways, had a direct and significant effect on eNOS (p<0.05), and through the EC-SOD activity pathways had a direct and significant effect on FMD (p<0.05). MICT reduced EC-SOD activity and also decreased the FMD value. Conclusion: HIIT is superior to MICT in increasing cardiovascular protection by increasing the concentrations of noradrenalin and eNOS, maintaining EC-SOD activity, and FMD in stable CHD patients after coronary stenting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-270
Number of pages14
JournalVascular Health and Risk Management
Volume16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • catecholamine
  • coronary heart disease
  • eNOS
  • FMD
  • high-intensity interval training
  • SOD

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