Association between the adverse drug reactions to anti-tubercular drugs and the treatment outcome: A retrospective, cohort study

Kurniaty Linggom, Purwantyastuti, Nafrialdi, Rasmin Menaldi, Febriony Citra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Patients with tuberculosis (TB) and positive sputum smears are source of disease transmission, effective treatment will break chain. The problem of therapeutic success seen from the success rate of treatment in Indonesia, especially in government hospitals is still 50%. We determined the association between adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and successful TB treatment at the Persahabatan Hospital. In this retrospective cohort study (174 subjects), the number of ARDs was compared with treatment outcomes among patients with positive sputum smears TB and receiving category I treatment between September 1, 2015, and September 30, 2016. Data were analyzed by chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. The number of ADRs was 34.5% (60/174 subjects). Minor ADRs were more common than major ADRs (46/60, 76.6 % vs 14/60, 23.3 %). The Success of TB treatment was 70.9% (39/55) in group with ADRs and 62 % (49/79) in group without ADRs. There was no association between incidence of ADRs and successful TB treatment (P = 0.29, chi-square test). However, the categorized of ADRS was related to the success rate of TB treatment, (P = 0.03; Relative Risk = 0.5; CI= 0.2-1). Incidence of ADRs was 34.5% with minor adverse events being more common. There was no association between occurrence of ADRs and successful TB treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1170-1173
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of International Dental and Medical Research
Volume12
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Adverse Drug Reaction
  • Successful
  • Tuberculosis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Association between the adverse drug reactions to anti-tubercular drugs and the treatment outcome: A retrospective, cohort study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this