Antigen-specific suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by a novel bifunctional peptide inhibitor: Structure optimization and pharmacokinetics

Rahmawati Ridwan, Paul Kiptoo, Naoki Kobayashi, Scott Weir, Michael Hughes, Todd Williams, Rondang Soegianto, Teruna J. Siahaan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to optimize the in vivo activity of proteolipid protein (PLP)-bifunctional peptide inhibitor (BPI) molecule to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in SJL/J mice and evaluate pharmacokinetic profiles of PLP-BPI. PLP-BPI is constructed via conjugation of myelin PLP139-151 with CD11a237-246-derived peptide (LABL) via a spacer. The hypothesis is that PLP-BPI binds simultaneously to major histocompatibility complex-II and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on the antigen-presenting cell (APC) and inhibits the formation of the immunological synapse during T-cell and APC interactions. In this study, the structure of BPI was modified by varying the spacer and was evaluated in the EAE model. Intravenous injections of BPI derivatives inhibited the onset, severity, and incidence of EAE more effectively and induced a lower incidence of anaphylaxis than that produced by unmodified PLP-BPI. As anticipated, production of interleukin-17, a proinflammatory cytokine commonly found in elevated levels among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, was significantly lower in Ac-PLP-BPI-PEG6- or Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2-treated mice than in phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice. These results suggest that BPI-type molecules can be modified to achieve more efficient and better tolerated BPI-based derivatives for the treatment of MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1136-1145
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume332
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2010

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