Anthropocentrisation and Its Discontents in Indonesia: Indigenous Communities, Non-Human Nature and Anthropocentric Political–Economic Governance

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter discusses the ‘anthropocentrisation’ of political–economic governance in Indonesia through the establishment, expansion and evolution of the modern state. The process began with colonial state-building in the mid-nineteenth century, following efforts by colonial rulers to exploit their colonies more effectively in order to compete in the global market. The creation of a unified national political and economic governance system with rigidly defined territories gradually displaced ecological governance systems of indigenous communities, and Indonesia’s independence led to further institutionalisation of anthropocentric political–economic governance. The authoritarian and developmentalist New Order government (1965–1998) consolidated the power of the state and its control over people and nature, effectively marginalising indigenous communities, despite the formal recognition of Adat Law. State transformation in the age of globalisation, fragmentation, decentralisation and internationalisation of state apparatuses has gradually loosened the grip of the state since the 1980s. Indigenous communities, supported by transnational advocacy networks, used this opportunity to create a governance space for themselves. While these initiatives have been partially successful, the loosening grip of the state does not mean the reversal of anthropocentrisation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNon-Human Nature in World Politics
Subtitle of host publicationTheory and Practice
EditorsJoana Castro Pereira, Andre Saramago
PublisherSpringer, Cham
Pages143-161
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-49496-4
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-49495-7
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Publication series

NameFrontiers in International Relations
PublisherSpringer
ISSN (Print)2662-9429
ISSN (Electronic)2662-9437

Keywords

  • Anthropocene
  • Indonesia
  • State
  • Political Economy
  • Indigenous communities

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