Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 (AKR1C3) Is a biomarker and therapeutic target for castration-resistant prostate cancer

Agus Rizal Ardy Hariandy Hamid, Minja J. Pfeiffer, Gerald W. Verhaegh, Ewout Schaafsma, Andre Brandt, Fred C.G.J. Sweep, John P.M. Sedelaar, Jack A. Schalken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current endocrine treatment for advanced prostate cancer does not result in a complete ablation of adrenal androgens. Adrenal androgens can be metabolized by prostate cancer cells, which is one of the mechanisms associated with progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 (AKR1C3) is a steroidogenic enzyme that plays a crucial role in the conversion of adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) into high-affinity ligands for the androgen receptor (testosterone [T] and dihydrotestosterone [DHT]). The aim of this study was to examine whether AKR1C3 could be used as a marker and therapeutic target for CRPC. AKR1C3 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in CRPC tissue, compared with benign prostate and primary prostate cancer tissue. High AKR1C3 levels were found only in a subset of CRPC patients. AKR1C3 can be used as a biomarker for active intratumoral steroidogenesis and can be measured in biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate specimens. DuCaP (a CRPC cell line that has high AKR1C3 expression levels) used and converted DHEA under hormone-depleted conditions into T and DHT. The DHEA-induced growth of DuCaP could be antagonized by indomethacine, an inhibitor of AKR1C3. This study indicates that AKR1C3 can be considered a therapeutic target in a subgroup of patients with high AKR1C3 expression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1449-1455
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular Medicine
Volume18
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012

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