A mathematical model of Zika disease by considering transition from the asymptomatic to symptomatic phase

D. Aldila, K. Rasyiqah, G. Ardaneswari, H. Tasman

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

This work presents a mathematical model of Zika disease considering infected individual transition from the asymptomatic to symptomatic phase. Zika virus (ZIKV) itself is a virus that belongs to arbovirus transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. It can also be transmitted through human contact such as sexual contact, blood transfussion, and transplacental infection. As a matter of fact, 80% of those who get infected by ZIKV are asymptomatic. In this work, we investigate the Zika model by considering individual transition case from the asymptomatic to symptomatic phase using SEAIR (host) - SI (vector) model. In this model, we involve human and mosquito populations which have a big role to the transmission of ZIKV itself. In this study, basic reproduction number (R 0) calculated as the largest eigenvalue of Next-Generation Matrix. Furthermore, analytical results also be conducted to determine the existence and local stability of the equilibrium point. A numerical simulation presented to analyze the sensitivity and elasticity of R 0 for some parameters involved in the model, and followed with simulation of autonomous system. We find that transition of asymptomatic to symptomatic case in Zika transmission hold an important role in determining the size of the basic reproduction number. More transition to symptomatic case are better to know the "dark"figure of the real cases in the field.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012001
JournalJournal of Physics: Conference Series
Volume1821
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Mar 2021
Event6th International Conference on Mathematics: Pure, Applied and Computation, ICOMPAC 2020 - Surabaya, Virtual, Indonesia
Duration: 24 Oct 2020 → …

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