A glance on biorefinery of chemical substitutes from agriculture and industrial by-products

Suraini Abd-Aziz, Misri Gozan, Mohamad F. Ibrahim, Lai Yee Phang, Mohd A. Jenol

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

The emerging field on the utilization of agricultural wastes and industrial by-products is the alternative way to find potential feedstocks for chemical substitutes. Chemical substitution focuses on finding new and less hazardous solutions for a particular process or product through a biorefinery approach. The interest in exploring alternative energy sources of feedstocks through the utilization of agricultural wastes and agro-industrial by-products increases due to rising global energy demand and the depletion of existing fossil fuel stocks. Agricultural wastes are defined as unwanted products as a result of agricultural activities, while industrial by-products are leftover from industrial activities with abundant organic and inorganic nutrient composition. The advanced biorefinery is capable of transforming the agricultural wastes and industrial by-products to various chemical substitutes or value-added products. This chapter in general summarizes the consolidated bioconversion, bioprocessing, and downstream process of the significant chemical substitutes produced from agriculture and industrial by-products in relation to the specific chemical substitutes that will be discussed in each chapter.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationChemical Substitutes from Agricultural and Industrial By-Products
Subtitle of host publicationBioconversion, Bioprocessing, and Biorefining
Publisherwiley
Pages1-17
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9783527841141
ISBN (Print)9783527351862
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Sept 2023

Keywords

  • Agricultural wastes
  • Biorefinery
  • Chemical substitutes
  • Consolidated bioprocessing
  • Industrial by-products

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